Fair housing for sober living: how the fair housing act addresses recovery

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: Fair housing for sober living: how the fair housing act addresses recovery?

 

Fair housing for sober living: how the fair housing act addresses recovery

There are many questions surrounding Fair Housing for Sobriety. How do they address addiction? Where do they fit in the continuum of basic human rights? These questions are raised by many with regards to the Residential Communities, also known as Behavioral Healthcare Communities, under construction. The Medical Treatment Communities, which will be built with Narcotics Anonymous houses will do much the same thing but with a few differences. First, the Medical Treatment Communities will not house all those who need help. It is not a place where all will be housed under the wing of Recovery Groups. Rather, the buildings and services will be focused on helping one’s who most need them most. Second, the professionals who will manage the facilities are required to use state-approved techniques to treat sober living. The goal is not to shift the focus from relapse prevention to simply keeping drug users alive in the hope that they might win back their sobriety one day. The goal is for each person to have their own Recovery Group to call on in times of need. Third, addicts and their families are afforded the same chances for their children to succeed in school that the Drug Users had. The large percentage of Drug Users who have successfully graduated from high school and college cannot be denied the chance at a similar reward. In some cases, this might include a Certificate of Diploma for Drug Treatment or even a formal degree in the same field. Finally, when it comes to the treatment of sobriety in Drug Treatment Facilities, the principles of Fair Housing for Sobriety, has been highlighted. Thiswould be the principles that go into making a decision to provide a certain treatment to someone who is considered a “burden” or someone who simply cannot recover from their addiction. These principles have been supported by a federal statute that requires all Federal Department of Health and Human Services Offices to develop “fair housing for recovery” principles and practices. Fair Housing for Recovery is the primary basis for determining if an individual is entitled to become a registered candidate for any type of treatment offered at the Recovery Place or Medical Treatment Community. With these principles in place, the Decision Maker must consider other areas in the Fair Housing for Sobriety, such as health and physical limitations of the drug abuser. Other considerations include “family medical needs” as well as insurance status of the patient. These factors can be controlled by the facility itself. It is important that the population at the Recovery Place or Medical Treatment Community is just that: a population of all individuals who want to recover. Their determination and refusal to allow these people to live on the streets have set the standard that is fair and just for everyone. Recovery is a long and often painful process. These are individuals who have made a life change from dope. These people deserve the opportunity to improve their lives in as many ways as possible, without having to live on the streets. Recovery isn’t something that can be rushed. Forcing rehab to a point of being completed before the Drug User can get off the street will make the recovery process more difficult.