How does the fair housing act pertain to sober living

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: How does the fair housing act pertain to sober living?

 

How does the fair housing act pertain to sober living

The Fair Housing Act of 1968 covers many facets of discrimination based on race, color, religion, national origin, disability, and sexual orientation. For those of us who live in sheltered housing, the Fair Housing Act applies as well. The Fair Housing Act provides, “No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin, be excluded from any assistance, program, or activity, because of his or her race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.” It doesn’t matter if you’re selling your house, living in a mobile home, in an apartment, a townhouse, condo, rent-to-own property, privately owned or on the federal or state-owned land, or living in a long-term care facility. The federal government has taken a firm stand against racial and religious discrimination and is committed to enforcing this act to ensure equal treatment for all Americans. In many cases, a difference in income level between two people who live under the same roof is not enough to keep one of them from having access to important resources. Section 8 vouchers are a part of the Fair Housing Act, and if you don’t have them, you can always apply for a rental voucher, which is a government subsidy that guarantees you enough income to pay your rent, and more if you qualify. But, even if you’ve got a voucher, the Fair Housing Act still applies to you. For example, if a family living in an apartment complex (which most do) pays their rent through the Fair Housing Act, and it’s determined that they have some type of disability, that tenant may be denied any type of housing assistance. Of course, they can appeal this decision. So, how does the Fair Housing Act pertain to sober living? This law covers any discrimination based on a person’s race, religion, sex, national origin, disability, and other protected categories. It doesn’t matter whether you’re at work at school, or if you’re in long-term care, the Fair Housing Act applies, and this doesn’t mean that a private owner of a single-family residence is only liable for any damages if someone in the house is considered by the Fair Housing Act to be “discriminated against.” If a private landlord has discriminated in other aspects of the residence, including in the home’s condition, the law might protect the tenants’ rights to fair housing and reasonable accommodations. One place where this law may apply is in regard to housing counseling, and how it can apply to sobriety programs. These programs are designed to teach people how to stay out of trouble, while also dealing with substance abuse, which is an ongoing problem. Other places where the Fair Housing Act might apply to sobriety programs are when a landlord refuses to rent to an individual who is considered too impaired to occupy the premises. The reason for this refusal is that there is a substantial risk of domestic violence, as an example. So, how does the Fair Housing Act pertain to sober living? This law protects the rights of the owner’s tenants in regard to such issues as landlord refusal to rent to an individual, proper use of services, the inclusion of alcohol or drug abuse in the program, or other important health-related issues. So, if you’re trying to find a place to live, you have a right to the Fair Housing Act. But, if you’re trying to find a place to live, you should also make sure that you are protected by the law when you live in an apartment or townhouse, if you’re a tenant or otherwise.