How to argue against sober living

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: How to argue against sober living?

 

How to argue against sober living

It’s not an easy job to argue against sober living. You are a “supporter” and that’s why you support. If you’re familiar with the substance abuse “reformers” (whether they are sobriety advocates or other advocates) and the rehabs (including my own which use the same label), then you understand why it is so hard to argue against their perspective. A few years ago, I interviewed a former “senior citizen addict” about why he had changed his ways. He told me that for the first time in many years, he was able to enjoy going out and socializing. In the past, being able to enjoy life had been a major factor in the relapse of addiction. He said: “when I was an addict, I couldn’t go out or go to the mall because the only way I could get out and do anything was to make excuses for why I wasn’t coming back. Now I feel good about going out because I’m not working out all the time. I’m able to meet people at bars and cafes and have a good time with them. I know that I’m able to live my life and I’m more motivated to do things because I don’t have to do them under the influence of drugs and alcohol. I was the most powerful drug addict in the world but now I’m not anymore because I’m helping other people to do the same thing.” We can change our attitude in any direction we want to go as long as we realize that change is a choice that we make. You can choose to stay sober or you can choose to recover. One is always better than the other. The choice of recovery is for you to make and the choice of living a life free from addiction is for you to make. On the other hand, you can always do what you did before you became sober. If you were just an “addict”, you would still have a problem. If you choose to get sober, the first thing you should do is look at the power of will power. You have the power to decide to get help and to change your attitude about getting help. You also have the power to choose whether you use your freedom from addiction to work out a relapse or to avoid it. Most people don’t want to get help for their addiction because they know that getting help will require too much from them and will disrupt their lives. They also don’t want to get out of the habit, knowing that getting sober is far too difficult for them. The problem is not that they don’t want to get help; the problem is that they believe they can get out of addiction and continue with their previous lifestyle. You can decide either to “swallow your pride” and believe that you can get sober and live a normal life without drugs and alcohol. Or you can choose to believe that you can overcome your addiction. This requires effort on your part because there is no magic potion that you can take. You need to have a clear view of where you are headed and how you will get there and make decisions based on that path. Make a decision to get sober today. There is a lot to learn in “How to Argument Against Sobriety Living.” You can choose a path and try to live your life the best way you can without getting in over your head by choosing a path where you can avoid the risks of relapse.