How to evict sober living tenants in california

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: How to evict sober living tenants in california?

 

How to evict sober living tenants in california

If you’re a landlord in California who wants to evict a tenant who is living on the premises, you will need to follow certain laws and rules that are applicable. As a landlord, you have many responsibilities and a variety of ways to evict a tenant who is living on your property. Usually, landlords have to first contact the city housing department in order to conduct a background check on the person before contacting him or her. The reason for this is because if the person is an actual resident of the state, it would be difficult for the person to move out due to legal reasons. They have to present themselves as residents to the police and at the same time must obtain valid identification. Besides obtaining a simple check on the status of the person’s residency, the landlord also has to request the police department to inform them whether they have any criminal records. If there are criminal records, then you should warn the tenant of his or her potential problems while moving out of the property. After informing the city housing department and the police department about the status of the person’s residency, the landlord can now take the next two subsequent steps. He must give a notice to the tenant stating that he is legally entitled to evict him, and he must also go ahead and file a temporary eviction order in the court. When this process is over, the tenant has to either move out within ten days of receiving the notice or face eviction proceedings. In most cases, the tenant is able to stay for ten days after receiving the notice, but then the landlord has to begin the eviction proceedings. In most cases, the tenant is not allowed to stay for more than one year. Depending on how long the rent control period has passed since the initial notice, the landlord can proceed with the eviction proceedings or request the court to extend the rent control period. In some cases, the landlord can even continue the eviction proceedings even if the tenant pays the rent, if the tenant fails to comply with the rules and regulations of the rental agreement. If the tenant is unable to move out for some reason, the landlord can ask the tenant to vacate the property. If the tenant refuses to leave the property, then the landlord can file a petition in court to evict the tenant. Most of the time, when a landlord files a petition to evict a tenant, the tenant can go to court and contest the eviction. The court will decide if the tenant is responsible for the violation of the rental agreement or not, or if the landlord is justified in kicking the tenant out. If the court finds that the tenant is responsible for the violation, then the court will consider the tenant’s previous inability to pay rent as a reason for evicting the tenant. If the court decides that the tenant is not responsible for the violation, then the court will decide on the amount of the fine to be imposed on the tenant. The reason for evicting the tenant is only possible when the tenant fails to comply with the rules and regulations of the rental agreement. If the tenant complies with the rules and regulations, then the tenant will avoid eviction proceedings, or the court will find that the tenant is not responsible for the violation. If the tenant is not evicted before the court decides on the fines, then the tenant can still leave the property and meet with their lawyer or an attorney to find out what the fines are and what other penalties are applicable. If the tenant is fined more than the amount of the monthly rent and the tenant is unable to pay the fines, then the court will just evict the tenant and deduct the fines from the rent.