Living sober among friends who drink

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: Living sober among friends who drink?

 

Living sober among friends who drink

Living sober among friends who drink is a difficult feat. Many of my close friends have tried to kick the bottle for many years and most just cannot do it. After all, we’re all very close and sharing our lives with others really does mean something to us. The disease of alcoholism runs in our family trees and we’ve all been stricken by an alcoholic problem at one time or another. I was an alcoholic before I had my kids, but I didn’t know until much later that I had my first child with alcohol and he has now had four children. Our relationship is fine, but we don’t visit each other very often anymore because there’s this deadly friendship between us. In the past couple of years, as we’ve become more successful and our society has become more tolerant of addicts, we’ve had to allow our children to live amongst us and we’ve had to give them the benefits of being around those who are heavy drinkers. Living sober among friends who drink and being friendly to them will not make you look like an idiot. I can understand how desperate your feelings might be when you’re living among friends who drink, especially if you haven’t got any friends who drink. You don’t have to buy into the bad reputation of the alcoholics and what they’re going through. Their daily lives will probably mean a lot to you. They can show you how little you really know about their lives. They’re trying to be happy and productive in spite of drinking all the time. It can be tough having to live a life half way between a drinker and a non-drinker, but it has to be done. What most people do not understand is that some of the best friends they’ve ever had could drink. The great ones have always known how to be honest with one another, how to be good friends and how to provide unconditional love. The alcoholics never think about being friends with anyone who drinks. They don’t think about giving love and care. They’ve learned that the only thing they can do is try to solve their problems. They’re not good friends because they have anything to offer to each other. It’s because they’re good friends because they’re friends. If you see a man who talks openly about his past and lives according to a pattern that closely resembles yours, chances are that he’s your friend. I never heard of an alcoholic telling his friends he was quitting because he was going to die from alcoholism. He may not actually be dead yet, but he certainly isn’t happy. He’ll still have the same friends. If your friends were drinking before they met you, they’re just as likely to talk about how it turned out when they actually met you. They might say, “This guy is so nice, and he also happens to be a great alcoholic.” When your friends sober up, they’ll be the most important people in your life. They’ll be the ones who help you see that there’s more to life than beer.