What do the levels mean in sober living

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What do the levels mean in sober living

As the name implies, living sober means going to the higher levels of sobriety. The meaning of the levels of sobriety varies from person to person and depends on your own specific circumstances. The next question you need to ask yourself is, what does the levels of sobriety mean? The levels of sobriety may be broken down into three distinct categories: the absolute, the intermediate and the relative. If you go by the stages of a dying person’s journey, you would understand that the absolute level of sobriety corresponds to the time before they reach the stage where they begin to realize they are dying. The intermediate level is the intermediate level between the absolute and the relative sobriety. Then, of course, we have the profound level of sobriety, which is referred to as “full-blown” sobriety in today’s terminology. The relative level of sobriety is the level between the intermediate and the full-blown sobriety. Kinds of Sobriety There are many kinds of sobriety. Many of them stem from specific stages in life. You can search for a level of sobriety through the term “stages of sobriety” to find out if it’s the one you’re seeking. Stages of Sobriety are divided into two groups, those that happen naturally and those that are the result of behavioral or clinical treatment. The latter is usually administered in an outpatient setting, while the former is administered in an inpatient setting. Social Factors One of the greatest challenges of the current world is what some refer to as “social suicide”. What are the social factors that lead to people turning to drugs? The most obvious factor is the lack of acceptance of people who use drugs in today’s society. Too often, when people turn to drugs they are hoping that there will be no social support for them in the event of their relapse. This leads them to the downward spiral of denial, isolation, and substance abuse. The fact that the easiest solution to the problem of addiction is to resort to drugs, makes it even more important that people provide support in the form of social and legal measures to save them from their self-destruction. When we talk about getting help with your own addiction, we are not talking about merely “getting clean”, we are talking about getting help with your own recovery. It is vitally important that you become knowledgeable about the different types of treatment available in today’s society and the social factors that contribute to addiction. There are three groups of treatment available: residential, outpatient and inpatient. Residential Care What do the stages of sobriety mean to you? The answer is this: once you have reached the first stage of recovery and have begun to successfully overcome your addiction, you will need to undergo a period of residential treatment to assist you in the process of recovering from your addiction. Residential care is often provided by a medical team that includes a psychologist, a psychiatrist, a psychologist’s assistant, a nurse practitioner, a physical therapist, a dietitian, and an employee of the substance abuse facility. Inpatient treatment If you have reached the second stage of sobriety, you will need to undergo an inpatient program. Inpatient rehab offers the individual an opportunity to deal with their addiction in a supervised setting. When inpatient treatment is conducted, treatment is always within the confines of the facility. These three different programs offer the individual with a comprehensive plan to treat their addiction from a psychological perspective. A plan that will not only assist them with their self-development, but will also lead them to get the assistance they need in order to recover from their addiction.