What happens when a sober living resident start drinking

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What happens when a sober living resident start drinking

It has happened to me many times, having an individual with a long history of alcohol abuse and a severe alcohol dependency problem. I also have a past personal relationship with an individual who had trouble controlling his alcohol problems and who ultimately died from the consequences of his behavior. I am, in the latter group, somewhat used to dealing with these people and making them aware of their own behavior, and it is good to learn this because everyone, including myself, can be taught some lessons about sobriety. When my loved one went through alcohol detoxification I explained to him to my children, all of whom also understood. I even made my husband and children aware that my loved one was in a treatment center and where he was staying. I also warned them that my loved one would not be around for much longer, and although they accepted this and kept up with my visits, they were justifiably concerned that they would be alone, particularly during those first few weeks of being away from their homes. I even mentioned the fact that my family, although long estranged from my loved one, was aware of the treatment he was going through and his eventual release from treatment. After having my loved one living at home and working with me at my job, I found myself in an unusual position. I was no longer a full-time caretaker, although this was still my first concern. Although my husband and children welcomed my new role in helping him get sober, I was concerned about the possibility of them taking over from me as the sole caretaker. I felt I was being deprived of the independence I so badly wanted. In spite of his progress toward sobriety, my son, who had been living with his father, felt that he should be allowed to move back into the house, as we were living in the same home for the entire time that my son was gone. The issue arose when I tried to explain to him that I was no longer part of the sober living program and that I was living by myself, but my son continued to believe that his father was still in the program. My concern about his feelings about leaving me was also weighing on me. It was becoming harder to explain to him how much he would miss me and that this decision was entirely his. Eventually I decided to make my son an offer he couldn’t refuse. I informed him that I would continue to live at home and not be living with his father, but I would be continuing with the program that he was attending. He seemed pleased with this arrangement and said that he now understood more about sobriety and what it would mean for him. However, at the same time, it was not what I wanted. I liked having a presence in the home and when I made an effort to explain to him that this new decision was completely his, he stopped me. At first, I thought he was putting up a fight or that he was simply rejecting the idea of living by himself. It was only later that I realized what was really going on. This time, however, I told him to make up his mind; either he wanted to live with me or stay with his father. He, of course, could choose which one he wanted to do. Living sober is the best decision that anyone can make. By having a loved one living at home with you, you will be providing important emotional support to a loved one who needs that emotional support the most.