Who wrote aa living sober book

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: Who wrote aa living sober book?

 

Who wrote aa living sober book

So you have decided to make a decision about whether to follow through with AA or not. The question is how you are going to get started? How are you going to make this decision about whether you want to continue following a program that will help you break your addiction, overcome the shame and stigma of being an alcoholic or something similar to that? Well if you decide to continue with the program, you have the option of continuing to live sober, go on a recovery support group or stay on the couch watching a reality show. There are also some unique ways of getting alcoholics back into treatment without having to admit to the institution that you are not cured, which I have read will be at times difficult. If you decide to continue with the program, the A.A. will most likely want to interview you and find out what type of follow up care you are looking for. This usually starts with an initial assessment and then after a few weeks of assessments will become more involved in the decision. The initial assessment is done in order to determine if you have come to the point where you are ready to move forward. The first questions usually start with questions such as “What has happened to you and your family and if there are any major changes” to determine if the program is doing the work for you or if you need a more aggressive approach. The next step would be a meeting with the a group for more extensive questioning on what you want to do. You will also be asked to give a written statement and to give a self-administered assessment. After the interview and a written report if there were no changes you will probably be asked to participate in some of the counseling and then in a recovery group. Your next step would be to find a recovery home and attend their group meetings and to try your best to quit. Once you find the place you want to go and you are able to go regularly, you will be asked to make a selection between the AA group and a non-AA group. With the advancement of technology and new methods of recovery support groups there are more options now than there were years ago. I strongly believe that the emphasis should be on the addict not the person in AA. AA should be viewed as one way of recovering from alcoholism and any suggestions that it is better than therapy is completely and utterly untrue. But if you do decide to stay in AA there are lots of resources available for you to use. The internet is full of useful resources for you to make good decisions about your own recovery and to help you lead a sober life. Also it is important to remember that there are others who are trying to help others like you get clean. Many good people who are concerned about our problem alcoholism join AA or in some cases even better if they see that the solution they are offering works and it is working well they will most likely be willing to talk to other alcoholics who may have different reasons for quitting. It is true that there are lots of very good reasons to stay with AA or at least to remain open to other ideas about helping an alcoholic. You will find that your chances of not needing to admit you are an alcoholic increase greatly once you become an alcoholic and are on your own.