Why sober living 30 day probation period

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About: Why sober living 30 day probation period?

 

Why sober living 30 day probation period

If you are a young adult who has drunk and driven in Pennsylvania, you have likely been given a choice by your court to enter into a plea of guilty or a plea of not guilty. The option to enter a plea of guilty will mean that your case will go to trial and the jury will determine whether you should be held criminally responsible for your actions. A guilty plea means that you will not have to face any penalties. While your personal circumstances might cause you to opt for a guilty plea, there are reasons why a young adult should avoid a criminal conviction. If you are a young adult in Pennsylvania who has been convicted of drunken driving offense, you are going to want to know the facts behind why a young adult should avoid a criminal conviction and decide whether you should enter a plea of guilty or not guilty. There are a number of reasons why a young adult should avoid a criminal conviction, but it is generally considered best for them to seek the advice of an attorney before deciding on a course of action. The criminal justice system works on cases being made, not on laws being made. In other words, your attorneys are skilled in working with the case laws that the courts use to determine whether or not a person is guilty of a crime. Many young adults find themselves faced with an arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. The fact that they were under the influence of alcohol or drugs does not mean that they should be found guilty of a crime. Any individual who makes the decision to avoid a criminal conviction by opting for a guilty plea is taking a serious risk. The decision to enter a plea of guilty in court case usually comes down to a legal reason. Perhaps the defendant feels pressured to plead guilty to avoid getting a harsh sentence from the court. Other defendants feel pressured to plead guilty because of other debts they have accrued which they feel would be adversely affected by the case proceeding. Some defendants have simply concluded that pleading guilty to a charge is less severe than facing a court trial. Perhaps the guilt of being arrested and convicted gives them pause when faced with the reality of having to accept a conviction. The decision of whether or not to plead guilty in court is not always an easy one. Many times, the temptation is stronger than others, and young adults can get sucked into the seemingly better options by good law firms who work on difficult cases. Ultimately, the decision is one of the more difficult ones that an individual must make because they may ultimately end up facing an overly punitive penalty if they choose to plead guilty. Another consideration when a young adult chooses to avoid a criminal conviction is a need to care for themselves while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. They will also likely be under the impression that they can choose to enter a plea of guilty or a plea of not guilty. This can lead to a young adult living in a state of alcohol or drug dependency rather than facing a citation and possible jail time. Instead of facing the prospect of living a new life as a convicted felon, many young adults find that their lives are changed drastically after being arrested and prosecuted. Alcohol or drug addiction can lead to a host of different problems in a young adult’s life, including depression, mental health problems, and job-related problems. Whether the young adult chooses to be disciplined through probation or through court-ordered treatment, the underlying decision is not always one that is well thought out. When a young adult chooses to avoid a criminal conviction, they are going to need to know that the state’s laws, and their own, are separate. Often, the state’s laws are designed to penalize not the intoxicated driver, but the driver who causes the incident. As such, a young adult is not necessarily obligated to follow the state’s laws as they pertain to a DUI. For all of these reasons, it is best to have an attorney review your case before opting for a plea of guilty or not guilty. If you don’t have an attorney, ask your family, friends, and co-workers for references.